Hey Poochy!

Helpful tips for happy paws.

Love fest — September 20, 2017
Purebred vs. Mixed – Which is better? — September 18, 2017

Purebred vs. Mixed – Which is better?

When it comes to purebred, you can look up dog’s size, personality, temperament and appearance ahead of time. The description usually matches purebreds. If you love surprises, than mixed breed is for you. Sizes and appearance are harder to predict. The same litter of puppies can be quite different in color, size and in the inheritance of their parents’ traits. Mixed puppies are usually unique as no 2 dogs are alike.

There are many debates, weather mixed breeds are healthier/better. This is not so. The puppy may inherit some genetic imperfections from its parent, regardless of purebred or mixed. Some breeds have genetic illnesses. Mixing breeds is used as a tool to repair the genetic deficiencies. For example: Bichon poodles are prone to seizures. Mixing Bichon and Maltese, produces a higher chance of a seizure-free dog. Since mixed breeds come from at least 2 breeds, there is a chance they will not develop breed-specific disease. Doing some research before choosing a breed, will help you understand the complexity of each breed.

Once again, all dogs are amazing. I am yet to meet a dog I didn’t like. So this preference is entirely up to you. When you treat your dog like family, they will grow up to be gentle, playful and affectionate.

Tips for Leashes — September 15, 2017

Tips for Leashes

Since I live in the city, leash is a necessity. And with huge selection from the stores, how do you know which leash to get? It all comes down to preference.

I prefer nylon leashes. They are durable, don’t easily stretch and are easy to clean. When choosing the right leash, consider the following:

  • Does it feel comfortable in your hand?
  • Does it slip out of your hard easily? If yes, than this is not your leash.
  • If the dog were to suddenly pull, would the leash cut into your hand?
  • Are the clips durable and easy to open/close?

For city dwellers, the leash shouldn’t be more than 4-feet long. It should be long enough to keep your dog close to you and out of danger, yet let it feel unrestricted. If you live in a more remote location, than you can give your dog a little more wiggle room, as you aren’t limited by space

Everyone Does This, You Should Too — September 14, 2017

Everyone Does This, You Should Too

Microchip is essential. In the event your dog goes missing, you want to be able to find it quickly. With microchips, the changes of getting it back are much better.


*** Good to Know ***

If the breeder offer to microchip your dog, accept that offer.


What is a microchip? It’s a tiny transponder, a digital ID, the size of a rice grain. It is implanted just under the skin of your dog. Each chip contains a unique identifier, dog’s name and owner’s information. Any veterinarian office is able to use a special device to scan it.


.:. Tips .:.

You cannot track your dog with microchip. Microchip contains mostly owner information and is not a GPS device.


 

Adopt Porsche — September 13, 2017
Fool Proof, Beginner Dogs —

Fool Proof, Beginner Dogs

Look at every dog as an individual – with its own personality and preferences. Therefore before getting a pooch, consider your living arrangements and the right dog for you. Some dogs need a yard to exercise and it would simply be cruel to restrict them from this basic pleasure. Some dogs have bad separations anxiety and don’t like being home along for extended periods of time. And some are simply afraid of everything and prefer to hide in your lap all day.

So how do you go about finding the right fit for you?

Looks like you are in luck! I found the best quiz, just for you– it will help you with determining the most suitable dog for your current lifestyle. So what are you waiting for? Click here to get started and find the right puppy!

 

How to create the perfect harmony — September 11, 2017

How to create the perfect harmony

If you are like me, than one dog is never enough. So I’ve made it as a rule, to allow the first dog to choose their mate. This does take some to find the right dog, but once it chooses its friend, there will be harmony.

Imagine for a moment, your parent bring home a complete stranger, off the street, and tell you, that this is your new sibling and you must love it like your own. Would you?

That’s how dogs feel about any other dogs that you bring home. So just to skip, all of the unnecessary hassle, I allow my pooch to choose their sibling/mate.

The main thing is to allow your dogs to establish their own hierarchy, in which the pack order is clear. This will ensure that conflicts will be rare.

Difference between Collar vs. Chest Harness — September 10, 2017

Difference between Collar vs. Chest Harness

Collars vs. Chest Harness                                   

I’m not a big fan of collars. I feel as if I am dragging my dog around by its neck, rather than allowing it to comfortable walk. Don’t get me wrong, there are pros and cons to both. However, as a personal preference, I love chest harness. I know that no matter how much the doggy pulls the leash, chest harness will never “choke” the dog. After all, when I go for walks with my pooches, I let them control where they want to go. If I see an obstacle, I can always redirect them, knowing full well, that they will change direction with a gentle tug of a leash.


*** Do not leave harness on your dog for more than 2 days. It might cause shaving and loss of hair. ***


So what’s the difference between collar and chest harness?  If your dog walks in zigzags, constantly tangling you in their leash, or squirm around a lot, than you can better control it with a collar, simply because they cannot twist around to all sides. However, as the collar sits on their neck, be sure that your dog doesn’t have an injury in the vicinity of a collar or trachea.

Chest Harness on the other hand, is more for dogs, who have mastered basic obedience skills. The harness should be well padded and fit the dog accurately, to avoid being too loose and to avoid chafes.

Click here for a helpful diagram about different chest harnesses, by Planned Urban Life.

The 9 Signs of a Healthy Puppy — September 9, 2017

The 9 Signs of a Healthy Puppy

The general rule is getting a puppy at 8 weeks old or later. It is essential for puppies to spend its first 8 weeks with its mother and siblings. In this short time frame, the puppy learns basic social behavior from its mother.  It develops its personality and learns how to get along with other dogs. If a puppy, is taken too early away from its mother, than it might miss out on learning basic social behavior. We all want our puppy to be happy and social.

Signs of a Healthy Puppy

  • Clear eyes and an alert gaze
  • The fur should be shiny, healthy and well kept
  • No discharge from eyes or nose
  • Has a nice “puppy tummy” and is well nourished
  • The anal region is clean
  • Puppy is curious and full of life, no trouble of running around, jumping and exploring everything around it
  • Expect dog’s droppings. There must not be white “rice” marks (tapeworm segments) nor  diarrhea
  • Check fur for fleas, by running your fingers against the lay of the hair
  • Check for blindness by moving an interesting object in front of them and check their reaction time
How to make your new dog feel welcomed —

How to make your new dog feel welcomed

My fur-family is about to get bigger. I can’t wait to welcome another pooch into my circle.  And while we are on a topic of a new poochy; here is the list of basic things to get, so your pooch feels extra special.

  • Water dish
  • Food bowl
  • Dog food/treats
  • Food mat (think of this as a bib for your floor. Puppies can be messy eaters)
  • Sleeping bed (I have one in each room of the house)
  • Collar with dogs name and your phone number
  • Leash
  • Brush/comb
  • Toys, toys, and more toys (better it chews on a rubber toy, than your shoes and cables)
  • Toothbrush/toothpaste – I’m not kidding
  • Tick Tweezers
  • Old towels